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20121222
20121222
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
on water and wastewater infrastructure systems are actually paying for it. narrator: cities and municipalities across the united states are now facing this funding gap, between projected revenue and projected expenses, as they strive to maintain water quality and meet demand. new york is the most densely populated city in the u.s. and over 40 million tourists visit the city every year. the 1.3 billion gallons of water required every day are delivered by a system of extraordinary scale and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny,
to street to chinatown. since 1957, we are the only city in the world that runs cable cars. these cars right here are part of national parks system. in the early 1960's, they became the first roles monument. the way city spread changed with the invention of the cable car. >> people know in san francisco, first thing they think about is, let's go across america, cities and towns, homes and businesses all depend upon one basic resource. modern civilization and life itself would be impossible without it. woman: okay, so today, we're going to look at how do we get our water? narrator: and today, it's a matter of simply turning on the tap. so often, we forget about the value of water. water is a commodity that is essential to life. 100 years ago, it would have been hard to imagine turning on the tap water. and now, it's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the rive
in the middle of a main thoroughfare anywhere in this city, particularly on columbus avenue, will destroy small business. even option 3 should be looked at very closely because there is an access shaft that is being proposed in the community meeting. no one was really clear about how long it would take to have it. no one was really clear about how big it would be. or how long it would be there. if you block a main thoroughfare, not only will you destroy businesses in north beach, but one of the reasons that the chinese community housing people have come up with support of this, you will disrupt business all the way into chinatown, all the way into lower grant avenue, all the way on stockton street. strongly urge you to do something with the pagoda palace because then you can do something that is really more key that would actually make a stop people would go to because they want to go to the subway stop which would be an amazing development. but don't do anything that allows a hole right in the middle of a main thoroughfare in any part of the city. >> thank you. >>> as a native san franciscan,
are better off with that initial overbuilding. >> had you satisfied or turnoff city about the internet? -- have you satisfied your curiosity about the internet? >> these weeks have reminded me of how important and how intertwined and how fascinating the way in which the infrastructure we have created has built itself up in cities and on the coasts. it brought me back to square one and keeping my curiosity on the systems and not just the internet, but power and aviation and the large complicated things that we depend on so much. >> "tubes" is the name of the book. andrew blum is the author. this is "communicators" on c- span. >> sometimes he was a cruel boss. he did not know how to apologize. many of his age and class, they're not going to apologize to a young and private secretary. he had a way of turning the tables. his version of an apology would be to say, well, i am a kind man and you are doing a good job today. but the issue was never settled. he always had to get the
the zoo day-to-day operation. it used to get 1.2 million dollars every year from the city now it gets less than half that amount so this donation will certainly come in handy. >> we want to share a wonderful story with you tonight about how some people in the south bay helped change a child's life and his smile in this season of giving. corrina on the very special gift for 14-year-old boy. >> unlike some patients sasha is exciting about going to the dentist and especially about this appointment. >> i woke up really early today so i woke up around 5ish and stayed up since. >>reporter: eighth grader at more land middle school in san jose anxious to get his brings off. almost as anxious as he was to get them on. >> i had this thing in my life people would make fun of me because of my teeth and how i looked. >>reporter: ukraine an family has no insurance so dr. randy lie and dr. joseph teamed up to provide his dental care for free. his overbite was so pronounced it was hard for him to even close his lips together and 2 molar needed to be removed. >> we had and/or al surge on extract
, and you do, one that the cities and counties and states should be proud of. because they get it. they get it out here. but the hospitals, they will have to figure it out. but what if you are a country and all of a sudden you have an earthquake and by the way the one thing you need most because of that earthquake, the hospital infrastructure, is gone. can we describe a scenario that could be like that? i remember when i was in college a popular thing was the national lampoon and they did a parody of the political science final. please write a scenario where world events and powers provide and results in total thermonuclear warfare results and the next question was, please create a lab practical to test your theory. is there a lab practical to test this theory? haiti. as you know, a few years ago the haitian people suffered an earthquake and the initial problem was crush injuries. yes, infection and dysentery and water supply and all those things would follow fairly soon, but the initial catastrophe was crush injuries, trauma, and the hospitals were gone. so what did we do?
than a distraction. >> reporter: new york city mayor michael bloomberg called the nra statement a shameful evasion of the crisis. the mayor wants what he calls reasonable restrictions. a ban on assault rifles and high-capacity magazines. and bloomberg has a cavalcade of stars demanding action. >> demand a plan. >> reporter: but the nra is making clear, that plan had better not infringe on the right of gun owners. for "good morning america," pierre thomas, abc news, washington. >> battle lines are clearly drawn. we'll get more on that story, coming up in the broadcast. >>> let's get over to ron for the latest headlines. >> hey, there. good morning, everyone. three people have been arrested for the deadly explosion that devastated an indiana neighborhood last month. the homeowner and boyfriend. there was evidence that the gas lines were tampered with. >>> and a federal judge has given final approval to bp's settlement on the massive oil spill in the gulf of mexico. the oil giant has estimated it will take $7.8 billion to help out businesses and individuals affected by the oil spil
with their song surf city. he approached torrens with his new business plan. >> i told him not to say anything until i had finished my presentation. >> it was here underneath the statue of tommy trojan on the campus of the university of southern, california where dean torrens was a student studying graphics where they would meet to discuss the bizarre plan to make some fast cash. >> we had done business deals together and this was in my mind another are opportunity. >> did he tell you he thought you were crazy? >> yes. >> and what did you say? >> i said i'm crazy but why don't you you loan me $500 and i won't bother you and let you get back to it your class. >> and gave you more than one check throughout this whole time? >> he gave me three or four. >> keenan used the money to hire help with the kidnapping plan. the first call went to his mother's ex-boyfriend a 42-year-old house painter named john irwin. >> he had fallen on hard times when i was making a lot of money and i set him and his family up with housing and a car. >> so he owed you one? >> and i called that in. he reluctantly agreed t
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)